Deborah

It has been said the littlest things in life can have the biggest impact. A kind gesture, a smile, a phone call all have the capacity to change the course of a life.

Broken Promises SW, a small rescue organization, received a phone call in January 2016 which ultimately saved the life of a very ill kitten. The caller reported there was an extremely lethargic kitten sitting in the middle of their parking lot. Broken Promises SW immediately picked up the kitten and named her Deborah, in honor of the woman who called them. Deborah was estimated to be younger than 3 months old and weighed only 1 pound, 4 ounces. Her eyes had imploded and her eye remnants needed to be removed once she gained enough weight providing her a better chance to survive the surgery. This precious baby also suffered from extensive mouth sores caused by calicivirus infection. She was treated with subQfluids, clindamycin, and oral vitamin supplements. Broken Promises SW was faced with the high cost of Deborah’s crucial eye surgery so they reached out to the Ian Somerhalder Foundation and received a Emergency Medical Grant.

On February 17, 2016 Deborah had two successful eye surgeries. The double enucleation included removing both of Deborah’s eyes, while leaving her eye muscles and orbital contents intact. Deborah proved to be a strong, resilient kitten. She came through the surgery smoothly, seemingly without too much stress and was released the same day. Broken Promises SW described Deborah as “a little withdrawn” before her surgery as “perhaps her eye remnants were bothering her.” Thankfully, upon recovering from the anesthesia following surgery, she became a new kitten and her recovery was uneventful. The rescue reported, “She’s much more playful and seems to be happier and more outgoing.”

The removal of Deborah’s sutures holding her eyelids together was the last phase of her surgery. She was then able to be vaccinated and micro-chipped and available for adoption. Broken Promises SW knew they faced the challenge of finding a special family who understood the needs of caring for a blind kitten. Deborah continued to flourish while she waited for her special family to come along, as according to the rescue, she is a “friendly, playful kitten despite her disability. She is eating well, purring, and is enjoying her new little life. She deserves to have an opportunity to live as happily as she can.” Broken Promises SW denied several applications for Deborah’s adoption due to various safety concerns in caring for a blind kitten, but the perfect fit was soon found. A woman who had previously adopted from Broken Promises SW wanted to foster and adopt Deborah. Only three days into her fostering she contacted the rescue organization to say she wanted to make it official. Broken Promises was thrilled and ran the adoption paperwork over to her the next day.

The volunteers at Broken Promises SW say, “Special needs animals are able to be adopted into great homes if you’re patient enough to wait for the right one to come along. Challenging health conditions, if treatable, are not insurmountable.” They are happy to share they “learned a lot about how these little babies can be helped and how they manage to get around a home in the dark.”

Broken Promises SW contacted ISF to say, “The Ian Somerhalder Foundation has been so helpful. The ISF Emergency Medical Grant made Deborah’s treatment and recovery possible. Thank you!” We at ISF would like to say thank you! Thank you to Deborah, the Good Samaritan who showed compassion for a kitten in need and decided to make a phone call and to Broken Promises SW for their work in rescuing animals.  

Littlest things in life can have the biggest impact, a phone call to an animal rescue, caring enough to give a nameless animal a name, compassion. Little things saving lives, one at a time.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

Written by: Theresa Blangiforti

Edited by: Bob Stone