Mabel

Mabel’s story begins in the south, where she lived out of a car with a well- meaning lady who was unable to care for her properly. After Mabel developed an infection in both eyes which her owner was unable to treat, she was surrendered to a high kill shelter where one eye was removed completely. Her other eye, which has limited vision, requires eye drops twice a day.  Friend of Wayne Animals Rescue (FOWA) in New Jersey heard about five year old Mabel and since they had a foster family who loved the Pekingese breed, it was decided to rescue Mabel from the southern shelter and bring her to New Jersey.

After settling into her new temporary foster home, sweet Mabel began to show signs of pain in her hindquarters. Her foster parents reported to FOWA Mabel was having accidents in the house and stopped wanting to go on walks. After being examined by a veterinarian, she was diagnosed with a genetic disease called Intervertebral Disk Disease and given anti-inflammatory and pain medication as well as cold laser therapy. When Mabel failed to improve, she was taken to a neurologist who determined she had an 80% chance of recovery with surgery.

With a grant from the Ian Somerhalder Foundation (ISF), Mabel underwent spinal surgery in March of 2014. The first two weeks after surgery Mabel was put on crate rest. As her spine began to heal, she was able to begin physical therapy and walk with the help of a sling. FOWA wrote to ISF “Her vet is very satisfied with her progress. She was so excited to get out of her crate after the initial two weeks that her tail was wagging like a little helicopter!”

Mabel is still waiting for her forever home. Her foster family wrote ISF, “It’s very important that she does not jump on furniture or play too hard with her foster brother because she is at risk for another injury. Mabel would do best in a home without other dogs or small children. We try to just keep her as calm as possible…our rule is all four paws on the ground at all times. Prevention of another injury is the key to keeping her healthy and happy. Despite her issues she is a VERY happy dog who loves to take walks, play with toys and she gets very excited for meal time and treats! Although, her absolute favorite thing is to just cuddle up on your lap and be pampered!” When asked what Mabel has taught them, Jan, a volunteer with FOWA wrote to ISF, “I have learned the extent to which individuals, medical providers and charitable foundations will rally around a helpless animal who had a poor start in life.” From rags to riches, we wish Mabel a happy future of cuddles and love.

                       

Written by Veronica Hampton