Planting Our Youth in Grassroots Movements

When it comes to Grassroots initiatives, our ISF Youth Volunteers set the bar high! There are endless reasons why YOU (kids and teens) should start projects at a local level:

  1. Call out the adults - When the adults in your community see YOU, a powerful young change maker, stepping up and taking action they will be inspired to make a difference, too.

  2. Getting your hands dirty - When you physically make a connection with your body, mind and heart, your passion and strength to make a difference will multiply!

  3. Green your mind - The sooner you start caring about the planet and its creatures, the greener your thoughts and actions will be as you grow up. Just think of all the amazing impacts you will make in your lifetime! Every single day your kindness, compassion, ingenuity and awareness will affect the decisions you make and the actions you take.

  4. Giving back - This is the community you are investing your lives and family in. Make it the best one.

  5. It’s fun!!

Lucas, ISF Youth Volunteer from New Hampshire, helped inspire hundreds of people to help save the New Hampshire State Wildcat, the Bobcat, from barbaric hunts. Lucas even stood before hundreds of people at the New Hampshire State House. His speech spoke to the hearts of all who heard him.

Ultimately, after overcoming a few roadblocks, Lucas and hundreds of New Hampshire citizens were successful in stopping the hunt of the Bobcats for the Winter season!

Thank you Lucas!!

 


 

Grassroot projects can be a way of life and learned early in life. Take our ISF Youth Volunteer Sydney for example! Sydney has volunteered at a horse rescue and sanctuary in Georgia since she was 3 years old! Yes, you read correctly...she was three when she and her family started volunteering at the horse rescue, teaching Sydney a love of animals and giving her the tools to make a difference! Now as a preteen, Sydney still volunteers and spreads awareness for animal rights and human compassion in grassroots initiatives and global awareness with ISF.

 


 

We have several ISF Youth Volunteers who work tirelessly for animal shelters such as Dylan, Mariah, Portia, William, Clara, Theresa, Dominic and Eoghan. They are just a few of our volunteers investing a lot of time and heart in helping their local shelters anyway they can and on a regular basis, even going as far as petitioning the town to consider becoming a “no kill” shelter!! It can be heartbreaking to go to an animal shelter and see the dozens, even hundreds, of animals without a family, but as animal advocates, we have to be a voice for each of them and get past our own heartbreak to create meaningful change in the lives of orphaned animals. Food and supply drives are an easy and impactful way to help out the rescues. You can even go just to pet and talk to the animals to give them some much needed love and affection.

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We have kids who have also started regular Community Clean Ups in their towns, stemming from being inspired by our youth projects here at ISF! No matter where you live in the world there IS a huge need for litter clean up! This is something we can all do whether it is at the beach, a park, your neighborhood...ANYWHERE. Get your friends and family involved too.Just 1 hour of cleanup can make a HUGE impact on our ecosystem! We can bet  the trash you will find the most is...plastic. Gross. It will make you never want to use that stuff again.   

                                      

Grassroots initiatives and projects catalyzed by our youth are critical to teach, empower and experience meaningful and tangible changes locally and globally. Global change starts at the local level. If we all start participating locally, eventually the entire world will be changing together connected from city to city. No matter your passion - the environment, animals, human rights, anti bullying, organic farming, kindness campaigns - they can all be done in your own backyard.  ISF is overflowing with kids and teens doing what this world needs us all to do ...roll up our sleeves and start making changes (and noise!), locally.

Written by Candi Fair

Edited by Bob Stone